Featured Articles

CCO Execution Chasm_ Customer Service and Marketing

To bridge the execution chasm, the Chief Customer Officer reporting relationship should be established after careful consideration of three factors in your company: 1. leader commitment;
2. understanding of the mission; 3. ability to work cross functionally.
The strength of an operating area’s ability to be an influencer in the company should drive the decision.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Are You Leaving Customer Memories to Chance? Decide with Clarity

Are you leaving customer memories to chance? Beloved companies identify the experiences they deliver. They know the memory they want customers to have, make decisions to create it, and take action to prepare their people and operations to deliver it.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Customer Experience Bookends

When you map out the customer experience stages, step away from ‘executing tasks’ and focus on the customer experience you want to deliver. To plan reliable delivery, you must know the customer emotions involved in the experience from beginning to end. If you deliver great personalized service, but parking is a nightmare, you still have a hurdle to clear.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Build Reliability into Your Experience

The interactions your customers have with your company show them how much thought you put into the moments of truth. Be operationally deliberate and “get it right.” You must clear the hurdle of random experiences and deliver reliability.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Power Core and CX Competencies

Successful customer handoffs require a chain of actions across the enterprise. These actions need to create a reliable experience for the customer.
Your company’s power core develops certain skills and pays less attention to others, so it has an impact on the ease at which cross-company CX competencies can be developed and integrated.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

CC Competencies - Engine for Growth

The customer experience that gains the most confidence with customers is to get the basics right. You must knit together the series of contacts you have with customers to bring a sense of reliability in what they can expect from you. Only after you established a reliable experience and gained their confidence, can you move to deepen a personal relationship that ultimately broadens into customers referring you to others.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Owning the Customer Agenda

by Jeanne Bliss on July 29, 2014

in Customer Experience Toolkit

Leaders Who Own the Customer Agenda

Customer experience work cannot be held inside a single department in the organization. It cuts its way across the organization, getting in people’s stuff and stirring up the pot. This work will challenge conventional thinking about how to approach the business, and what’s important to manage and measure.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

CX competency 5 - One Company CX Leadership

Competency #5 is about communication, leadership and organizational dynamics. The most successful customer experience companies address the customer experience across the silos.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Customer Leaders Must Have Guts

by Jeanne Bliss on July 22, 2014

in Customer Experience Toolkit

6 Actions of Salmon Leadership - Leaders with Guts

It’s easy for leaders to say they want to focus on the customer. But most do it without knowing what they’re signing up for. Some don’t realize that they need to personally have skin in the game. This work won’t budge from hand wave to action without two leadership attributes: gut and guts.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }

Customer Hand-offs Require Silo Collaboration

Silo dysfunction is the inability or lack of collaboration inside the corporate machine to link together what it does for and to the customer. Customers are lost in the handoffs between your departments and you lose sight of them when they fall in the cracks between the silos. One of the hardest skills will be for the company to learn how to work cross-functionally.

{ Be the first to comment on this article. }